The Law of Democracy: Legal Structure of the Political Process (University Casebook Series)

January 9, 2017 - Comment

This book created the field of the law of democracy, offering a systematic account of the legal construction of American democracy. This edition is the most significant revision in a decade. With the addition of Nathaniel Persily, the book now turns to a changed legal environment following such blockbuster Supreme Court decisions as Citizens United

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This book created the field of the law of democracy, offering a systematic account of the legal construction of American democracy. This edition is the most significant revision in a decade. With the addition of Nathaniel Persily, the book now turns to a changed legal environment following such blockbuster Supreme Court decisions as Citizens United and Shelby County. This edition streamlines the coverage of the Voting Rights Act, expands the scope of coverage of campaign finance and political corruption issues, and turns to the new dispute over voter access to the ballot. The basic structure of the book continues to follow the historical development of the individual right to vote; current struggles over gerrymandering; the relationship of the state to political parties; the constitutional and policy issues surrounding campaign-finance reform; and the tension between majority rule and fair representation of minorities in democratic bodies.

For more information and additional teaching materials, visit the companion site.

Comments

MCD23 says:

Its not the worst casebook I’ve been assigned Its a casebook. If you’re here, it because you’ve probably been assigned this book by a professor and don’t have much choice in the matter. Its not the worst casebook I’ve been assigned, the organization is nice, they do a good job with the notes after the cases, and the editors have done a good job with editing the cases so they are manageable (Citizens United is only like 21 pages).

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